SPOOKERS

2017; directed by Florian Habicht; 90 mins

With Pecking Order and McLaren, 2017 has shaped up to be a bloody fine vintage for Kiwi docos and this wonderful, beautiful, intelligent, heart-warming, homegrown shock-doc caps it all off and could very well be my film of the year! Continue reading

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LE SAUVAGE

1975; directed by Jean-Paul Rappeneau; written by Jean-Loup Dabadie, √Člisabeth Rappeneau and Jean-Paul Rappeneau; 107 mins

[No english language trailer, sorry]

So, here’s a film I saw completely out of the blue, basically because it’s the last screening that I could get to this year at the Dunedin Film Society and I needed to use up my three-ticket pass. Went in completely unaware of what it was other than it was an old French rom-com. Now! I’ve nothing against rom-coms (per se) but recently, doing the weekly reviews, the genre that has stood a mile out for sheer awfulness has been French rom-coms! Continue reading

CARLITO’S WAY

1993; directed by Brian De Palma; adapted by David Koepp; 134 mins

I’m on and off with Brian De Palma, love Mission: Impossible, Redacted: crap. His 1983 gangster epic, Scarface, starring Al Pacino didn’t really work for me. People say Carlito’s Way is Scarface‘s sober cousin but Braindead looks sober compared to that film! This is still big, brash, slick, stylised movie-making with big emotions, big scores and big violence… but I really liked it! Continue reading

GOD’S OWN COUNTRY

2017; written and directed by Francis Lee; 104 mins

British Brokeback Mountain has been the rather lazy comparison to what is, at face value, the most Daily-Mail-baiting movie of the year (last year, of course, was The Neon Demon). Well, happily, it’s way more than that, it’s a harsh, elemental British kitchen sink drama of the highest pedigree which features one of the finest love stories I’ve seen since I dunno when! Continue reading

THE DEVIL RIDES OUT

1968; directed by Terence Fisher; adapted by Richard Matheson; 86 mins

Possibly the most frightfully English horror film I’ve ever seen, presented by the iconic Hammer, adapted by American genre legend Richard Matheson from the novel of the same name by Dennis Wheatley, stamped up front with the good old ‘X’ certificate and featuring not one but two Bond villains in the shape of Charles Gray and Christopher Lee! Suffice to say, it was promising going in and it delivers – providing that you’re willing to leave your cynicism at the door… Continue reading